Hey there Vancouverite artists, photographers, sculpters, cosplayers and creative people. I am hosting a small meet and greet for deviants, and I would like to open it to tumblr artists in the area as well. Feel free to join us at any time on wednesday, october 1st from 3:30 - 5:30 in the main food court of the Central Branch of the Vancouver Public Library.
Bring your sketchbook, bring your camera, bring your creativity and fun.
Hope to see you there!
http://fav.me/d7zs6mx <- For maps and more details

Hey there Vancouverite artists, photographers, sculpters, cosplayers and creative people. I am hosting a small meet and greet for deviants, and I would like to open it to tumblr artists in the area as well. Feel free to join us at any time on wednesday, october 1st from 3:30 - 5:30 in the main food court of the Central Branch of the Vancouver Public Library.

Bring your sketchbook, bring your camera, bring your creativity and fun.

Hope to see you there!

http://fav.me/d7zs6mx <- For maps and more details

View high resolution

1 day ago · 2 notes · Tagged kxhara robynrose devmeet deviantart tumblr meetup art jam

majozaur:

see more:

https://www.facebook.com/takmaj.majawronska

(via variouscontent)

Source: majozaur

Originally from takmaj

3 weeks ago · 1,544 notes

senshistock:

Available now! SenshiStock Sketch is a web app that lets your jump through random SenshiStock images for sketch, gesture and warm up drawing.
Use the timer for shorter or longer poses, hit the random button for a new pose at any time. Pause if you need a bit more time with a pose!
Happy drawing!

senshistock:

Available now! SenshiStock Sketch is a web app that lets your jump through random SenshiStock images for sketch, gesture and warm up drawing.

Use the timer for shorter or longer poses, hit the random button for a new pose at any time. Pause if you need a bit more time with a pose!

Happy drawing!

View high resolution

Originally from SenshiStock - Drawing References!

3 weeks ago · 1,255 notes

hearditbothways:

Figured it was time to update the brush set that I use, since a few people have asked and it’s been a few years. Since my last brush post, I’ve cut down on a lot of brushes that I never really used, but I’ve also found a ton of new ones (mostly Jaime Jones’, Shaddy Safadi’s, and Sergey Kolesov’s, along with making a bunch of my own).

Aaand not that anybody asked for a process video, but here’s a timelapse for that Corvo painting. It’s not the clearest (definitely never using livestream again uuugh), but hopefully it will give some insight on how I’ve been doing my paintings lately.

[BRUSH DOWNLOAD] [PAINTING VIDEO]

If the link for the brushes breaks for whatever reason, feel free to send me an ask and I’ll be sure to fix it!! Enjoy(ΦωΦ)

(via artrefsandinspiration)

Source: hearditbothways

Originally from Heard It Both Ways

1 month ago · 890 notes

skepticarcher:

Break Through

New paint plus an additional detail shot - it’s kind of a tall piece so it’s hard to really get tumblr to do it much justice. There’s a slightly bigger version of it you can see as a whole here.

Available as a new print in my Society6 shop

(via beastlyart)

Source: skepticarcher

Originally from skepticArcher - ART BLOG

1 month ago · 18,214 notes

katsaw:

Carnivore Incarnate.

I began making this work for the Animal/Advance exhibition at the beginning of the year. Initially three books were planned but due to academic commitments I could not complete the other two. The brief was pretty open so I wanted to do something that related to my Little Red Riding-Hood thesis last year. Basically the starting concept for the intended series was the use of werewolfism as a metaphor for puberty.

This makes sense because:

  • Puberty = growth of androgenic hair
  • The pattern of the menstrual cycle is traditionally linked with the moon
  • Menstruation is linked to more angry/antisocial moods, similar to the werewolf’s lunar-induced episodes

For this reason I decided to use cut-outs to create a page-through mouth on the cover, which symbolically ‘bites’ the intended viewer upon picking up the book. After this the viewer goes into the mind of the wolf, past the surface layer of sheer hunger into the deeper levels of its consciousness as the ‘curse’ begins to take hold. The work of Angela Carter was a big influence, both in this work and my thesis. Her story “The Company of Wolves” is obviously a more sexual retelling of the Red Riding-Hood fable, and I wanted to play with that.

I wanted there to be an overarching theme of consumption – both with food and sexually. Unfortunately I could not show every page in the book but it is littered with the detritus of kills until the sexual images begin to dominate as one pages through the work.

(via inspirationalartshit)

Source: katsaw

Originally from girl with pen

1 month ago · 380 notes

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

(via xiiau)

Source: delano-laramie

Originally from miimows

1 month ago · 11,954 notes

syntheticimagination:

some BG paintings from the past months :)

(via beastlyart)

Source: cat-meff.deviantart.com

Originally from noot noot

1 month ago · 2,173 notes

color questions

terreverte:

zurgetron answered: Your art always has such beautiful colours. Any advice on picking colour palettes?

since my colors are commented on alot or asked about- i thought i should make this it’s separate post- i generally like to pick a single base color and build a saturated color scheme around that.

but here are a couple other things and quirks i keep in mind. these were my own personal take-aways i carried over from school and work.

1. if you have your values and temperatures right- the colors you choose doesn’t matter! this is true of rendering- but also of design! (composition and characters) if you can pinpoint your focus via value and temperature- the rest is icing on the cake. if you take a look in my pastel boxes you can see this kind of arrangement:

image

2. warm light = cool shadows. cool light = warm shadows.

image

3.(this might not make sense now- but hold on) every color, despite it’s original temperature, has a cooler and warmer alternate version of itself.

image

4.although white and black are very useful and provide a really strong statement- don’t rely on them as a crutch when mixing colors- alternatively use saturated colored alternatives.

image

5. and here’s the kicker… if “realism” isn’t your goal… break whatever rules you need to to make it a more appealing piece!  (ah, now here’s where 3 &4 make sense!) if you know HOW to break the rules via color- you manage to make colors work for you, not work for your colors. one instance i use this alot in is yellows- yellows can go really bad really fast when you try to mix cool or darker colors in- instead- i use oranges to go darker to make it feel more golden. it’s not accurate- but i love the vibrant alternative. this is also something i picked up at work- because of color compression- sometimes things just didn’t look nice or right- and i had to pick darker analogous colors to make assets work.

image

6. finally, like i said earlier,  if you can, pick 1 main base color and build a scheme around it- not trying to make a scheme off alot of colors. if you look at some of my more successful pieces you can say “the main color of that is…” (purple, blue, cyan, orange, reddish-brown)

image

so.. knowing all these things.. this is what my color picker choices look like in photoshop:

image

 i tend to stay in the saturated zone but use all the values and then i slide the hue selector up and down for temperatures.

hope this explains enough of what i do- it’s not necessarily a tutorial or anything- it’s just some things i personally keep in mind.

(via rukomi)

Source: terreverte

Originally from Scribbles

2 months ago · 1,203 notes

inspiredchoob:

In love with dolaical73’s work at the moment, such a confident sense of light and colour. More of his work can be found here: http://www.pixiv.net/member.php?id=575079

(via rukomi)

Source: inspiredchoob

Originally from Inspired Choob

2 months ago · 6,171 notes